10 Essential Customer Service Metrics to Measure Your Team Performance

Customer service is a delicate function to manage. Here everyday targets are as important as big picture goals, and simple misses can spiral down to multiple backlogs pretty quickly.

You are always one escalation, one bad review, one late response away from losing a customer for good. Is every member on your team pulling their weight in working towards this? Here are the 10 best customer service metrics and key performance indicators (KPIs) to evaluate your team performance and set your team up for success from day one.

10 Best Metrics to Evaluate Your Team Performance

  1. Average Number of Queries Handled
  2. Customer Satisfaction Score (CSAT)
  3. Average First Response Time
  4. Average Response Time
  5. Average Time to Closure
  6. Average Responses
  7. Average Responses to Closure
  8. First Contact Resolution
  9. Ticket Backlog
  10. Average Handling Time

1. Average Number of Queries Handled

The average number of queries handled per day is a simple but effective indicator of the support team capacity. Measuring individual team member performance gives you insight into how many queries everyone can handle while maintaining quality and customer satisfaction. Too many backlogs could either mean you need to hire more people or provide additional training to your customer service team for better resolution times.

2. Customer Satisfaction Score (CSAT)

CSAT score is short for customer satisfaction score, which measures how satisfied are your customers with your business. CSAT is one of the most popular customer service metrics used today. CSAT survey is simple, and it evaluates each customer touchpoint rather than the whole support experience. This way you can address the root cause of any bottlenecks and control the churn rate. You can also identify the key moments that earned you a satisfied customer. Measure CSAT scores by agents using Satisfaction Survey Report. There are also other metrics such as the Net Promoter Score (NPS) and Customer Effort Score (CES) you can use to track customer experience.

3. Average First Response Time

First response time is the timeframe between when a customer logs a query and when he receives the first response. The average first response time is the typical time your support team takes to give the first response. Customer satisfaction surveys show that customers who give the highest satisfaction ratings are the ones who get their first response in under 60 minutes. Average first response time is both a performance and success metric, for it reflects both efficiency and subject matter expertise of your support team. 

4. Average Response Time

Average response time is the typical time taken by a support agent to respond when a customer contacts. Unlike first response times, average response time is more of a performance metric than a success metric. Faster first response time is a great goal to push for. But day-to-day targets are just as important, and you need to set certain benchmarks in place for team accountability. Businesses mention average response time in Service Level Agreements (SLAs) to let customers know what to expect when reaching the support team. It makes business hours and availability clear so customers don’t feel like they are left hanging. Setting the expectations right improves customer satisfaction and hence customer retention rate.

Now, how do you evaluate your team’s SLA compliance? One of the best ways is to run an SLA report comparing your team performance against your SLA targets. This will help you spot any discrepancies and adjust your sails at the start, instead of after multiple customer complaints and escalations. 

5. Average Time to Closure

Time to closure or resolution time is the time elapsed between the logging of a customer request and its resolution. The average time to closure is affected by a number of factors including the complexity of the customer issue, the time of logging, and your support team’s resourcefulness and knowledge base

Average time to closure = Total resolution time / Number of queries resolved. 

6. Average Responses

Average responses is the number of responses or interactions happening in a typical customer conversation. Note that it does not map a query lifecycle from start to closure, but instead counts the back and forth replies in every individual interaction between the customer and the support agent.

These metrics help you track the performance of your customer support team day in and day out. Whether you do it to keep things in order or to seal any gaps in the service experience, the ultimate purpose of these metrics is to save your team’s time and effort wherever possible. You need to have a smart tracking system in place so that your team does not have to spend time updating these metrics, which is a separate task in itself. Set up tools like Agent Activity Report and Smart Rules Report which employ automation and pre-set rules to track your team performance.

7. Average Responses to Closure

Average responses to closure is the total number of responses the agent made from the first response until the closure. Average responses to closure have a direct correlation with many other important customer support metrics. Keeping responses per query minimal will drastically improve your first response time, the average time to closure, and average response or reply time. However, simply trying to decrease responses per resolution might make your customers feel hurried towards closure. Equip your support team with resources and clarity so the customers actually get the solution they are looking for without multiple interactions. 

8. First Contact Resolution

Multiple interactions are a recipe for frustration for both your customers and your support team. Some queries do require more time and attention than usual, but not all. First contact resolution is moving the support request to closure in the very first interaction. It is both an efficiency and a success metric because it requires the support agent to have information at fingertips. Tracking this metric will also help you understand your team member’s strengths and improvement areas, so you can balance them out with additional training. Use Help Desk Performance Reports to track and drill down the first contact resolution rate by teams, agents, departments, and industries.

9. Ticket Backlog

Ticket backlog refers to the number of unresolved support tickets at a given time period. These queries exceed the typical resolution time due to any or all of the following reasons — complexity, ticket volume spike, or any unexpected dip in team performance. These backlogs also indicate the gap between targets vs reality. If your customer service team faces a constant ticket backlog, it is either time to address your staffing needs or assess your team’s performance. Or simply, you need a reality check on your targets. Start assessing your ticket nature by Ticket Inflow and Ticket Distribution Reports or even make your own Custom Fields to include the metrics exclusive to your business.

10. Average Handling Time

Average handling time or average handle time (AHT) is most relevant to contact center support. AHT is the average time a support member spends on a customer call, and sometime after until every action item related to the phone call is closed. This includes the total conversation time, hold time, and the time taken to complete any post-call tasks. 

Conclusion

Tracking your performance and seeing a positive impact on your customer relationship is gratifying. But the scope of the support function is always evolving and it is bound to outgrow your metrics at some point. Employ the right metrics that are also scalable to get the most out of your effort. HappyFox BI has an extensive range of Help desk Performance Reports to work with, with each one focused on maximizing your support team productivity. Sign up for a demo with our product experts to learn more!